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Build Immunity in Our Community Challenge

University community meets Build Immunity in Our Community Challenge

We did it! Our community achieved the 70% vaccination goal of the Build Immunity in Our Community Challenge and will ease COVID-19 safety protocols.

While the danger from the virus and its variants continues, the 70% immunization rate we achieved will provide an appreciable level of immunity and should help protect our entire campus community. We will continue to encourage those of you who have not been vaccinated to schedule your vaccine appointments before fall semester so that we optimize our health and safety as a community. While the University is working on organizing vaccination clinics for the campus community when students return in August, each of us can improve our individual immunity if we are fully vaccinated before returning. 

We also ask the campus community to be inclusive and respectful of colleagues and classmates who choose to continue certain practices, such as wearing face coverings, maintaining physical distance, or avoiding handshakes or hugs.

Please remember, if pandemic conditions change, safety protocols for campus may be reinstated at any time on short notice. 

You can read the complete announcement about meeting the challenge here.

What's Your Why?

Why did you choose to be vaccinated? Share your story and we may feature you on UD's social media.

Share Your Story

FAQs about the challenge

The Build Immunity in the Community Challenge aimed to have at least 70% of the entire campus community vaccinated by July 1. The University announced July 9 that it met the challenge.


We realize there are a number of reasons why individuals can't get the vaccine. We also realize there is a minimum level of immunity we need to reach in order to have a more normal campus life. In working with our medical panel, we established a threshold for the University to begin easing restrictions. We need everyone to do their part to help protect the community.


Please remember, if pandemic conditions change, safety protocols for campus may be reinstated at any time on short notice. 

Effective July 9, 2021:

  • There is no general mask requirement on campus, except in health care and other specialized settings.  Mask wearing continues to be a valuable form of protection for those at higher risk of infection and should continue for people who are not fully vaccinated, especially indoors and in crowded settings. Please support and respect unvaccinated, vulnerable individuals, and others who choose to wear masks.
  • There is no six-feet physical distancing requirement on campus. Classroom, meeting rooms and dining facilities will return to full capacity. 
  • Meeting, gathering and event protocols on campus are no longer in effect. 
  • Travel still is subject to the approval of the sponsoring unit; all regulations governing travel to your destination and, if traveling abroad, your return to the United States; and, if applicable, any organizing or sanctioning body such as the NCAA. Group travel can happen with certain restrictions and additional risk review (additional details forthcoming).  
  • Guests are allowed in student residences.

The following protocols remain:

  • Do not come to work or class if you're experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. Contact your primary care physician or the student health center for evaluation and possible testing.
  • Please use UD's online contact form to disclose if you have been a close contact of someone with COVID-19 or have COVID-19
  • Unvaccinated individuals and all who test positive will still be required to quarantine and/or isolate based on the University’s protocols in consultation with its medical advisory panel, e.g., following any travel, if identified as a close contact, if presumed positive, etc.
  • Anyone in quarantine or isolation must coordinate with their supervisor or class instructor regarding time away from work or the classroom. Remote learning is no longer an automatic option for students.
  • Individuals may be subject to surveillance and targeted testing the University, in consultation with its medical panel, determines is appropriate based on the nature of the pandemic on campus, including suspected clusters in specific areas or populations.

If you have completed your vaccination (even your first dose of a two-dose vaccine), upload a photo of your vaccine record to UD's confidential portal by scanning it or taking a picture with your phone.


  • Unvaccinated individuals and all who test positive will still be required to quarantine and/or isolate based on the University’s protocols in consultation with its medical advisory panel, e.g., following any travel, if identified as a close contact, if presumed positive, etc.
  • Anyone in quarantine or isolation must coordinate with their supervisor or class instructor regarding time away from work or the classroom. Remote learning is no longer an automatic option for students.
  • Individuals may be subject to surveillance and targeted testing the University, in consultation with its medical panel, determines is appropriate based on the nature of the pandemic on campus, including suspected clusters in specific areas or populations.

FAQs about vaccines

Upload your official COVID-19 vaccination card, which includes your full name, date of birth and vaccine details on the confidential "Report Your Vaccine" portal.

The confidential process used for collecting and storing COVID-19 vaccination information is similar to that which all first-year students currently follow to submit their other vaccinations. Your vaccination information will be treated confidentially; it is not tied to employment or academic records.

Once you upload your vaccination record, you should receive a confirmation email from notify@teamdynamixapp.com with the subject line "[Confidential] Report of COVID-19 Vaccination Received."


Yes. Like all other vaccination information collected by the University, your COVID-19 vaccination is treated confidentially. Only our medical providers and those charged with contact-tracing and similar COVID-19 responsibilities will be able to see your vaccine status; all of those individuals have committed to keep such information confidential.

Your vaccine status is not tied to employment or academic records. The confidential process used for collecting and storing COVID-19 vaccination information is similar to that which all first-year students currently follow to submit their other vaccinations.

For certain activities for which vaccination status may be relevant, your vaccination status may be shared with those planning the event. However, this information will be only shared as needed, and on a confidential basis. Additional information beyond mere vaccination status would not be shared.

 


Yes, because of the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and because reinfection with COVID-19 is possible.

Experts are unsure how long someone who had COVID-19 will have natural immunity. They have said the duration of immunity after having COVID-19 is variable and could go away as early as three months. Vaccination boosts and extends that protection, including to new variants identified as of June 2021.

You can read more from the Centers for Disease Control here.

Individuals who are vaccinated will not be subject to entry or surveillance testing, or required to quarantine as a close contact. Because of the uncertainty about the duration of immunity from having COVID, students who are not vaccinated ⏤ even if they have had COVID-19 ⏤ will be subject to both.


According to an Ohio Department of Health update July 2, the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) continues to recommend COVID-19 vaccination for individuals 12 years of age and older, given the risk of COVID-19 illness and related, possibly severe complications such as long-term health problems, hospitalization and death. 

The American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Medical Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Heart Association, the American Nurses Association and several other organizations have joined the CDC in issuing a joint statement on COVID-19 vaccination and myocarditis/pericarditis

“The facts are clear: this is an extremely rare side effect, and only an exceedingly small number of people will experience it after vaccination. Importantly, for the young people who do, most cases are mild, and individuals recover often on their own or with minimal treatment. In addition, we know that myocarditis and pericarditis are much more common if you get COVID-19, and the risks to the heart from COVID-19 infection can be more severe,” according to the statement.

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has updated COVID-19 Vaccine Emergency Use Authorization fact sheets for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for patients and providers to include the risks of myocarditis and pericarditis following vaccination. In addition, the CDC updated for providers its clinical considerations regarding myocarditis and pericarditis. These updates follow a review of information and a discussion by the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices last week. The FDA and CDC will continue to monitor reports, collect more information, and follow up to assess longer-term outcomes over several months.

Since April 2021, there have been more than 1,000 reports of cases of myocarditis and pericarditis after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination (i.e., Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna) in the United States. However, not all cases have been verified. The CDC is evaluating 484 total reported cases, 323 of which meet the CDC working case definition for myocarditis or pericarditis. All of these cases were among vaccine recipients younger than 30. The CDC notes these reports are rare given the millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses administered.

Read more information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention here.


In Ohio, you can schedule an appointment through the state's streamlined vaccine tool, or book directly with a local provider, such as Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County or Premier Health. New appointments are posted regularly.

For other areas of the country, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a vaccine finder along with other information on COVID-19 vaccines.


The Vatican's doctrinal office has declared it ‘"morally acceptable" for Catholics to take any of the vaccines. 

This video from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops addresses moral and ethical concerns about COVID-19 vaccines, including special considerations about the J&J vaccine.